CPATF Timeline and NPS Major Milestones

 

June 2017:  CPATF leads effort of 73 organizations in writing to the President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis, highlighting the need to implement the National Pain Strategy as part of a long-term strategy to address the chronic pain and opioid epidemics.

July 2016: CPATF launches a 30-day White House Petition urging implementation and funding of the NPS. 

June 2016: Senators Hatch and Schatz sent a sign on letter to HHS with bipartisan support urging implementation of the NPS|

April 2016: A diverse group of more than 70 organizations sends letters to the Senate HELP and House Energy & Commerce Committees urging them to call on HHS for NPS implementation plan.

March 2016: Department of Health and Human Services releases the National Pain Strategy

March 2016: CPATF submits testimony to the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance, which includes several key recommendations from the NPS.

December 2015: CPATF sends letter to U.S. Congress

September 2015: CPATF successfully hosts first Twitter chat on the NPS

September 2015: Proto Magazine publishes ‘The Politics of Pain’, which highlights the NPS and features interviews with several CPATF leaders

June 2015: CPATF members joined over 100 other leaders in Washington D.C. at the National Pain Strategy Collaborators Meeting convened by PAINS to identify opportunities to advance the implementation of the NPS.

May 2015: More than 2000 letters in support of CPATF’s goal of funding and implementing the National Pain Strategy (NPS) were submitted to HHS and NIH during the 30-day public comment period to review the NPS report.

April 2015: CPATF issues a press release and collectively sends tens of thousands of emails to its members, calling for HHS to proactively develop a federal oversight body and start the budgeting process now

April 2015: National Pain Strategy report is released on April 2 for public comment through May 20

February 2015: The CPATF sends a letter to the Department of Health and Human Services, calling for the release of the NPS for public comment

November 2014: The Department of Health and Human Services begins the federal clearance process to prepare the NPS for solicitation of public comments

October 2014: The IPRCC completes and submit The National Pain Strategy to the Department of Health and Human Services

May 2014: IPRCC releases the 2011 IPRCC Federal Pain Research Portfolio Analysis Report assessing trends and critical gaps in the types of investments in and pain projects supported by funding from all Federal government agencies.

June 2015: CPATF members joined over 100 other leaders in Washington D.C. at the National Pain Strategy Collaborators Meeting convened by PAINS to identify opportunities to advance the implementation of the NPS.

May 2015: More than 2000 letters in support of CPATF’s goal of funding and implementing the National Pain Strategy (NPS) were submitted to HHS and NIH during the 30-day public comment period to review the NPS report.

April 2015: CPATF issues a press release and collectively sends tens of thousands of emails to its members, calling for HHS to proactively develop a federal oversight body and start the budgeting process now

April 2015: National Pain Strategy report is released on April 2 for public comment through May 20

February 2015: The CPATF sends a letter to the Department of Health and Human Services, calling for the release of the NPS for public comment

November 2014: The Department of Health and Human Services begins the federal clearance process to prepare the NPS for solicitation of public comments

October 2014: The IPRCC completes and submit The National Pain Strategy to the Department of Health and Human Services

May 2014: IPRCC releases the 2011 IPRCC Federal Pain Research Portfolio Analysis Report assessing trends and critical gaps in the types of investments in and pain projects supported by funding from all Federal government agencies.

September 2013: IPRCC & Oversight Panel Chairs meet with Assistant Secretary for Health

June 2013: NIH Office of Pain Policy/Oversight Panel Compile and Review Working Group Nominations

May 2013: NIH/IPRCC  establishes Oversight Panel

April 2013: The American Academy of Pain Management announces the launch of the State Pain Policy Advocacy Network (SPANN) website, sppan.aapainmanage.org  wich tracks pain legislation and regulations that affects your practice and find out how to become an advocate

March 2013: NIH Office of Pain Policy/IPRCC develops Working Group Structure, Organization, and Representation

March 2013: NIH Office of Pain Policy publicly solicits of Nominations for Working Groups

October 2012: IPRCC charged by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health to create a comprehensive population health level strategy for pain prevention, treatment, management, and research.

March 2012: IPRCC holds its inaugural meeting (Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee)

July 2011: Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Treatment, and Research report was released to the public and presented the findings and recommendations of the IOM committee convened to identify barriers to pain care and ways to overcome these obstructions.

2010: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111-148) incorporated H.R. 756 into its final language, resulting in the late 2010 launch of an IOM consensus study to explore the public health significance of pain in the U.S.

2009: The National Pain Care Policy Act, H.R. 756, was introduced to address barriers impacting the improvement of pain care research, education, training, access, outreach and care. H.R. 756 called for an IOM conference on pain care and an expansion of NIH pain research (basic and clinical) through the Pain Consortium and the establishment of an Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee (IPRCC) to coordinate efforts within HHS and other Federal agencies relating to pain research, including identifying critical gaps in research and duplication of efforts plus expanding collaborations. The Act also called for programs to improve health professionals’ understanding and ability to assess and appropriately treat pain, as well as required the Secretary of HHS to develop and implement a national outreach and awareness campaign on pain.